Leuchars Patent Bramah Lock

The Leuchars Patent Bramah lock was inspired by the same thought processes that created the Asprey Patent Bramah lock; to have a lock that could counteract the forgetfulness of its owner by not only automatically locking itself, but also allowing the box to be opened even if the key has been misplaced.

Based on the self-locking Bramah lock, the Leuchars Patent requires a clockwise (approximately 20-45 degree) twist movement of the front aperture to achieve the same action of disengaging the locking mechanism as with the Asprey Patent Bramah lock. However, twisting the front aperture with one’s thumb and forefinger is somewhat awkward when compared to the effortless action of the Asprey Patent Bramah lock; indeed it was recommended that the key be half inserted into the Leuchars lock to act like a handle, in order to aid an easier twist action.

When Asprey acquired the firm of Leuchars in 1888, they also assumed the rights over their existing patents. Asprey continued on the  manufacturing of Leuchars Patent locks for their own boxes, offering them to customers as an additional option within their existing lock inventory.

An 1865 'W. Leuchars Patent' Lock taken from an Antique Coromandel Jewellery Box with Two Drawers and Secret Floor Compartment, by Leuchars.

An 1865 ‘W. Leuchars Patent’ Lock taken from an Antique Coromandel Jewellery Box with Two Drawers and Secret Floor Compartment, by Leuchars.

The Leuchars Patent lock uses a clockwise (approximately 20-45 degree) twist action of the front aperture to disengage the locking mechanism.

The Leuchars Patent lock uses a clockwise (approximately 20-45 degree) twist action of the front aperture to disengage the locking mechanism.

Antique Coromandel Jewellery Box with Two Drawers and Secret Floor Compartment, by Leuchars.

Antique Coromandel Jewellery Box with Two Drawers and Secret Floor Compartment, by Leuchars.